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Salute to service: Post honors 14 retirees at ceremony

Retirees (back row) Franklin L. McClanahan, Col. Jeff Foe, CW5 Larry D. Jones, 1st Sgt. Rodney K. Cox, (front row) CW4 Carl Snyder, CW4 Shawn Bates and CW5 Jim Massey are shown just prior to retiring during a ceremony Jan. 22 at the U.S. Army Aviation Museum. (Photo by Jim Hughes)

Retirees (back row) Franklin L. McClanahan, Col. Jeff Foe, CW5 Larry D. Jones, 1st Sgt. Rodney K. Cox, (front row) CW4 Carl Snyder, CW4 Shawn Bates and CW5 Jim Massey are shown just prior to retiring during a ceremony Jan. 22 at the U.S. Army Aviation Museum. (Photo by Jim Hughes)

Retirees (back row) Col. Stephen S. Seitz, CW4 Benito A. Belgrave, CW3 Samuel Fitz, Maj. George Johnson, (front row) CW3 Keith Cox, CW3 John Wilson and Jesse A. Lambert are shown just prior to retiring during a ceremony Jan. 22 at the U.S. Army Aviation Museum. (Photo by Jim Hughes)

Retirees (back row) Col. Stephen S. Seitz, CW4 Benito A. Belgrave, CW3 Samuel Fitz, Maj. George Johnson, (front row) CW3 Keith Cox, CW3 John Wilson and Jesse A. Lambert are shown just prior to retiring during a ceremony Jan. 22 at the U.S. Army Aviation Museum. (Photo by Jim Hughes)

Published: January 28, 2016

FORT RUCKER, ALA. (Jan. 28, 2016) -- With more than 400 years of combined service, 12 Soldiers and two Army civilians retired Jan. 22 at the Fort Rucker Quarterly Retirement Ceremony in the U.S. Army Aviation Museum.

Col. Shannon T. Miller, Fort Rucker garrison commander, hosted the event with garrison Command Sgt. Maj. William D. Lohmeyer assisting.

After thanking the retirees and their families for their outstanding service to Soldiers, to the Army and to the nation, Miller reminded them they would always be a part of the Army family.

“Your legacy will continue to live on in our Army — that is what truly makes our Army the greatest Army in the world,” she added.

This quarter’s retirees are listed below.

Col. Jeff Foe

Foe, deputy commander and assistant dean of the U.S. Army School of Aviation Medicine, entered military service in 1985 after receiving his commission through the University of Wyoming Reserve Officer Training Corps program. He said the highlights of his career included fulfilling a lifelong dream of becoming an Army Aviator and having the opportunity to mentor Soldiers. He and his wife, Pamela, plan to reside in DuPont, Washington, and also to take a recreational vehicle across the U.S.

Col. Stephen S. Seitz

Seitz, director of simulation with the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence, entered military service in 1986 after graduating from Indiana State University as a professional pilot major on an ROTC scholarship. He said the personal highlight of his career was traveling throughout Asia and Europe with his wife and son. He said his professional highlight was working with talented simulation professionals who provided world-class training support for hundreds of exercises. He and his wife, Eneicy, plan to continue to reside in Enterprise.

Maj. George Johnson

Johnson, 164th Theater Airfield Operations Group S3, entered military service in 1998 in Chattanooga, Tennessee – the only person commissioned from the University of Tennessee that spring, he said. He said the highlight of his career was his command tour at the Yakima Training Center, Washington, where he flew both the UH-1V and UH-72A. He and his wife, Mary, plan to reside in Enterprise.

CW5 Larry D. Jones

Jones, U.S. Army Pacific Command food adviser, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, entered military service in 1984 as a food service specialist. He became a warrant officer in 1995. He said the highlights of his career were serving as a food operations sergeant, drill sergeant instructor, and as a training, advising and counseling officer and senior TAC officer at the U.S. Army Warrant Officer Career College. He and his wife, Mary Lou, plan to reside in the Wiregrass area.

CW5 Jim Massey

Massey, Directorate of Training and Doctrine Flight Training Branch chief, entered military service in 1989 as a warrant officer flight training candidate. He said the highlight of his career was serving as a training developer at Fort Rucker. He and his wife, Catherine, plan to reside in Dothan.

CW4 Carl Snyder

Snyder, 2nd Battalion, 10th Aviation Regiment, 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, battalion standardization officer, entered military service in 1989 as a machinist in the Virginia Army National Guard. He transitioned to active duty as an aircraft mechanic in 1991 and in 2000 was selected for Army Warrant Officer Flight Training. He said the highlight of his career was serving as the company standardization officer for C Co., 4-159th Aviation Regiment with the 101st Airborne Division. He and his wife, Shelly, plan to reside in Enterprise.

CW4 Shawn Bates

Bates, Air Traffic Services Command director of logistics, entered military service in 1989 as a Patriot Missile System operator and maintainer. He was selected to become an electronic systems warrant officer in 2002. He said the highlight of his career was being a maintenance and logistics mentor to the Afghan national army in Gardez, Afghanistan. He and his wife, Jessica, plan to reside in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

CW4 Benito A. Belgrave

Belgrave, B Co., 1-212th Aviation Regiment chief of standardization, entered military service in 1994 as a power generation engineer. In 2000, he was selected for Army Warrant Officer Flight Training. He said the highlight of his career was serving as a medical evacuation pilot in support of U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq, and using his military training, experiences and expertise to affect countless lives on the battlefield. He and his wife, Valerie, plan to reside in Enterprise.

CW3 Keith Cox

Cox, F Co., 1-212th Avn. Regt. UH-60M instructor pilot course section leader, standardization pilot and instrument examiner, entered military service in 1993 as an infantryman. In 2002, he was selected for Army Warrant Officer Flight Training. He said the highlight of his career was his first deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He and his wife, Holly, plan to reside in Enterprise.

CW3 Samuel Fitz

Fitz, E Co., 1-212th Avn. Regt. Aviation aircrew training plan coordinator, entered military service in 1995 as an airborne combat medic. In 2005, he was selected for Army Warrant Officer Flight Training. He said the highlight of his career was performing jumpmaster duties during a 173rd Airborne Infantry Brigade operation in Iraq. He and his wife, Rose, plan to attend graduate and medical school together in Florida.

CW3 John Wilson

Wilson, A Co., 1-223rd Avn. Regt. track chief of the instructor pilot course, entered military service in 1996 as a CH-47 Chinook mechanic. In 2004, he was selected for Army Warrant Officer Flight Training. He said the highlight of his career was serving as an air mission commander in support of special operations forces in Afghanistan. He and his wife, Mandy, plan to reside in Flora, Illinois.

1st Sgt. Rodney K. Cox

Cox, USAACE NCO Academy Operations Branch chief, entered military service in 1993 as a Chaparral crewmember and later re-enlisted as an air traffic controller.  He said the highlight of his career was leading Soldiers as a first sergeant. He and his wife, Jaye, plan to reside in Enterprise.

Jesse A. Lambert

Lambert, maintenance officer course master instructor, is retiring after 40 years of distinguished service. He has served in Army Aviation as an NCO, a warrant office Aviator and a civilian employee. He said the highlight of his career was being personally responsible for training more than 10,500 commissioned officers, mid-grade warrant officers, and officers from foreign allied nations, and the distinction of training every maintenance officer and test pilot serving in the Army today. He and his wife, Vivien, plan to reside in Daleville.

Franklin L. McClanahan

McClanahan, U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center director, civilian injury prevention, is retiring after more than 36 years of distinguished service. He entered civil service in 1978 in Mannheim, Germany. He said the highlight of his career was providing a safe and healthful working and living environment for Soldiers, Army civilians and family members. He plans to reside in Daleville.

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