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Written in Stone: Museum places bricks to recognize contributions

Brig. Gen. Michael D. Lundy, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Rucker commanding general, cuts the brick paver dedication ribbon with retired Lt. Gen. Daniel Petrosky, Army Aviation Museum Foundation chairman, June 12 at the Army Aviation Museum. (Photo by Sara E. Martin)

Brig. Gen. Michael D. Lundy, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Rucker commanding general, cuts the brick paver dedication ribbon with retired Lt. Gen. Daniel Petrosky, Army Aviation Museum Foundation chairman, June 12 at the Army Aviation Museum. (Photo by Sara E. Martin)

Published: June 19, 2014

FORT RUCKER, Ala. (June 19, 2014) -- Soldiers — past, present and future — who want to immortalize their contribution to Army Aviation, or others who’d simply like to see their names etched in stone at the U.S Army Aviation Museum, are invited to purchase commemorative bricks that are featured on a new walkway at the museum’s entrance.

As the museum ends Phase 1 renovations and gears up to begin Phase 2, officials have begun a program to sell brick pavers that people personalize and have placed on the walkway, and more than 500 bricks have already been set.

The ribbon cutting and dedication ceremony to commemorate the first few batches of bricks was held June 12 outside the museum where the bricks will lay forever.

“Today we have added another service. And that service provides the opportunity for all military members and all visitors who support Army Aviation in any way to immortalized their name in the museum,” said Daniel Petrosky, Army Aviation Museum Foundation chairman.

Money raised from the pavers goes into AAMF’s fund to further improve museum exhibits and grounds.

Many of the stones featured list Aviators’ names that have passed either on duty or with the passage of time.

“There is a lot of science and technology that the Army has put into this museum, so people, especially Aviators, should be proud of it and they should consider placing their name or a battle buddies name on one of the bricks,” said Petrosky.

Aviators that flew the many kinds of aircraft that are featured at the museum deserve a lasting legacy for generations to come, he said, adding that this is their chance to celebrate a loved one by purchasing an engraved brick paver that will be displayed and viewable to all that enter the museum.

People don’t have to put their name on a brick – call signs, logos, symbols, sayings and anything else “within reason” is allowed to be placed on a paver, said Petrosky.

Brig. Gen. Michael D. Lundy, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Rucker commanding general, said that the museum is a special place to Aviators, and that he considers the museum the hope chest for the future.

“When I was a young lieutenant, I brought my Family here and I thought about what my future held. This place linked me to my past – my Aviation legacy,” he began. “Now, (more than 25) years later, I can think back on what it meant to me at that time to reflect on the power of this location as a young officer.”

The commanding general continued by saying that the brick pavers can now serve as an Aviation hall of fame.

“This is an anchor to our home. This is a fitting way for Soldiers to leave their mark behind for those to come,” he said after the ceremony ended. “This is a place to preserve our history and a place of reflection on what it means to be an Army Aviator.”

Lundy said that Aviation can be a Family business, and it can mean a lot to a future pilot to see a Family member’s name carved in stone in 20 years.

“(These are) more than a lasting legacy – (these are) memories,” he said.

Each brick paver costs a donation of $150, and all brick paver donations are tax deductible.

To learn more, visit www.armyaviationmuseum.org, or stop by the museum during operating hours.

This article was originally published at http://www.army.mil/article/128495/

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