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110th Aviation Brigade

Commander, 110th AB

Col. Jayson A. Altieri

Commander, 110th AB

Col. Jayson A. Altieri began his military service in 1984 as an enlisted soldier in the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division. In 1989, he graduated from Norwich University’s Military College of Vermont. In the 1990s, he served in various Army Aviation... More

Command Sgt. Maj., 110th AB

Command Sgt. Maj.
Stanley D. Singell

Command Sgt. Maj., 110th AB

Command Sgt. Maj. Stanley D. Singell is a native of Point Marion, Pa., and entered the Army on July 26, 1984. He attended Basic Combat Training at Fort McClellan, Ala., and the OH-58A/C Helicopter Repairer Course... More

"Warriors"

Insignia

 

The 10th Aviation Group was activated on June 30, 1965 and evolved from the 10th Air Transport Brigade (Test). It supported the 11th Air Assault Division.  When the 11th was disbanded, the 10th remained at Fort Benning, Ga., to provide all aspects of training for Aviation companies preparing to deploy to Vietnam. The 10th Aviation Group was inactivated and redesignated back to the 10th Aviation Group in 2004.  On March 1, 2005, the 10th Aviation Group was redesignated as the 110th Aviation Brigade.  The Aviation Training Brigade at Fort Rucker assumed this unit designation and lineage on the same day. The mission of the 110th is to provide the Army and allied forces with professionally trained Aviators and non-rated crew members through planning, coordinating, and executing formal flight instruction at the undergraduate and graduate level.

The 110th Aviation Brigade consists of the Headquarters and Headquarters Company which provides staff assistance to four battalions.  Each battalion has a unique mission.  The 1-11th Aviation Regiment, reassigned to 110th Aviation Brigade in October 2010, provides air traffic services for all aviation training for U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence -- including the operation of the Army’s largest Radar Approach Control.  The 1-14th Aviation Regiment at Hanchey Army Heliport trains Aviators in the AH-64D and OH-58D aircraft.  The 1-223rd Aviation Regiment at Cairns Army Airfield and Knox AHP trains Aviators and flight engineers in the CH-47D/F aircraft, primary and instrument evaluations, and all fixed-wing qualification courses.

C Company, 1-223rd Aviation Regiment (formerly 3-210th Aviation Regiment), conducts training in the Mi-17 helicopter.  The 1-212th Aviation Regiment at Lowe AHP and Shell AHP trains Aviators in the UH-60A/L/M aircraft and provides evaluation flights for the Initial Entry Rotary Wing students' basic combat skills phases of training.  B Company, 1-212th Aviation Regiment (formerly the 2-210th Helicopter School Battalion), trains Spanish students in the UH-60 and OH-58C aircraft at Lowe and Shell AHPs.  The brigade also provides crash rescue and air ambulance support to USAACE and surrounding communities and serves as the Department of the Army Night Vision Device Training and Operations Staff Agency.

When the brigade assumed the numerical designation as the 110th Aviation Brigade in March 2005, it inherited an illustrious lineage.  The noteworthy history of the 110th Aviation Brigade represents the untiring efforts of true professionals and serves as a solid foundation for future endeavors.

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